Demolition Ball Miami Fort Lauderdale Florida

Demolition Ball Miami Fort Lauderdale Florida

Demolition Ball Miami Fort Lauderdale Florida

Demolition Ball Miami Fort Lauderdale Florida

Allie Demolition, Inc. also is committe to our community by providing environmentally safe, green services; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. We strive to minimize the effects of demolition on the environment, by cleaning up debris. Always recycling resources, and providing a clear job site for future developers.  We are available in Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Boca Raton, Palm Beach, South Florida counties and the Caribbean. Call us now for a free quote (305) 513 4994; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida.

Our experience and meticulousness have le our demolition company to complete some of the most challenging. And dangerous commercial demolition jobs in the Miami-Dade area, with precision and safety; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. Our ability to create turn-key solutions has made us a dependable company for all projects. No matter the complexity of the job or how big it is, we bring it down; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida.

That’s why Allie Demolition, Inc. has been the number 1 demolitions company in the greater South Florida, Miami, Fort Lauderdale. And the Caribbean over 30 years of commitment and hard work to achieve our customer’s goals. With the best quality that we can offer for your demolition; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. Ok is not enough for us! We prefer excellent.

Demolishing

When one thinks of demolishing a building. The image of a massive wrecking ball smashing through the structure is usually the first thing that comes to mind; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida.

The wrecking ball is the quintessential symbol of demolition in the cultural consciousness. Even acting as the logo of the National Demolition Association. But this classic building smasher is becoming rarer and rarer as the years go by. Construction forums have posts from former “ballers” lamenting the dying art of the wrecking ball. And they are a rare sight out in the world. In fact, a Flickr search for “wrecking ball” will pull up more images of Bruce Springsteen than construction equipment.

Though the spherical wall-slammer has been the industry standard for decades. You’re more likely to see a wrecking ball in a Miley Cyrus video than out on the streets. Knocking down buildings, so why are we still so obsesse with this instrument of destruction?

It is unclear who first invente the wrecking ball. The simple pendulum device was likely innovate and refine over a number of variations before becoming the uniformly iconic device it is thought of as today; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. One of the earliest examples of wrecking ball demolition seems to be the breaking of the SS Great Eastern, in 1889. The massive iron ship was scuttle in the River Mersey and smashe to bits over the course of 18 months.

Wrecking Balls

Once wrecking balls began being use to take down brick and concrete buildings. They prove to be an increible innovation; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. Prior to the widespread use of the wrecking ball. Most buildings were taken down by teams of workers known as barmen who would take down structures using small tools and elbow grease.

It was really an era of hand tools, the history of demolition, hoist crowbars, and pickaxes. They would simply pry buildings apart with these hand tool; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. It was a brick-by-brick process

This method of demolition actually known as deconstruction was laborious and costly but had the upside of salvaging building materials that could be reuse in future construction; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. It wasn’t widely appreciate in the early 20th century, recycling building materials were quite an extensive practice.

Industry

Demolition Ball Miami Fort Lauderdale Florida

Demolition Ball Miami Fort Lauderdale Florida

There was an industry of salvaging and cleaning bricks, and putting them back to work. It’s too bad that we move away from that, demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. But move away from it we did once demolition crews realize that a giant metal ball could take down a building much faster, and more importantly, much cheaper than a crew of men using their hands.

The wrecking ball first became widespread in the 1940s, achieving peak ubiquity over the next two decades, becoming the industry standard, and invading the wider cultural consciousness; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. While there were variations in the equipment and design, the technology behind the wrecking ball has always been rather basic, or elemental.

A massive ball of forge steel weighing as much as 12,000 pounds is hung from a crane and swung into a building, letting inertia and gravity do the majority of the work. There are a few different methods of “balling”: the ball can be dragge back and release, letting it swing into the building; it can be hoiste to a great height and droppe; or the crane arm itself can be spun, whipping the ball at its target.

As a quick, cheap, and dirty method of taking down a building, the wrecking ball became the preferre method of demolition. Large tracke vehicles such as cranes and excavators came on the scene, from which you could hang a wrecking ball.

Pay a Crew

You no longer had to pay a crew of barmen to spend all this time taking apart a structure piece by piece; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. That combination of factors, saving on labor costs, and the advent of technology really transforme the industry.

A wrecking ball is a heavy steel ball, usually hung from a crane that is use for demolishing large buildings; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. It was most commonly in use during the 1950s and 1960s. Several wrecking companies claim to have invente the wrecking ball. An early documente use was in the breaking up of the SS Great Eastern in 1888-1889, by Henry Bath and Co, at Rock Ferry on the River Mersey.

In 1999, the wrecking ball was describe as one of the most common forms of large-scale coarse demolition; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. Although the wrecking ball is still the most efficient way to raise a concrete frame structure, its use is decreasing. With the invention of hydraulic excavators and other machinery, the wrecking ball has become less common at demolition sites as its working efficiency is less than that of high-reach excavators.

Construction and design

Modern wrecking balls have had a slight re-shaping, with the metal sphere change into a pear shape with a portion of the top cut off. This shape allows the ball to be more easily pulle back through a roof or concrete slab after it has broken through.

Wrecking balls range from about 1,000 pounds (450 kg) to around 12,000 pounds (5,400 kg). The ball is made from forge steel, which means the steel is not cast into a mold in a molten state. It is forme under very high pressure while the steel is re hot (soft but not molten) to compress and to strengthen it.

Method of use

To demolish roofs and other horizontal spans, the ball is typically suspende by a length of steel chain attache to the lifting hook of a crane boom above the structure, the rope drum clutch is release and the ball is allowe to free-fall onto the structure; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida.

To demolish walls the ball is suspende at the desire height from a crane boom and a secondary steel rope pulls the ball toward the crane cab; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. The lateral rope drum clutch is then release and the ball swings as a pendulum to strike the structure.

Another method for lateral demolition is to pivot the crane boom to accelerate the ball toward the target; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. This is repeate as neee until the structure is broken down into debris that can easily be loade and haule away. The demolition action is carrie out entirely through the kinetic energy of the ball.

Demolition work has been carrie out using a 5,500-pound (2,500 kg) wrecking ball suspende from a Kaman K-MAX helicopter

Modern equivalents

While The advancement of technology le to the development and use of blasting charges. Safer than dynamite and more efficient or practical than wrecking balls, to destroy buildings; demolition Ball in Miami and Fort Lauderdale in Florida. The most common use of blasting charges is to implode a building, thus limiting collateral damage; see demolition. Wrecking balls are more likely to cause collateral damage because it is difficult to completely control the swing of the ball.

However, wrecking balls are still use when other demolition methods may not be possible due to local environmental issues or asbestos or lead building content.

 

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